Drink Up

Water is Life has partnered up with scientists from Carnegie Mellon and the University of Virginia to create the “The Drinkable Book,” a book which consists of filter paper that purifies drinking water using silver nanoparticles. Dr. Theresa Dankovich, creator of the paper, says that the water that goes through this product is comparable to our tap water here in the U.S. She is proud to say that it reduces great than 99.9 of bacteria count in water.

The video explains that the book is very cheap to produce and sustainable. One paper can last a month and a book can last up to four years. It is also extremely simple to use and educates people on each page about safe water habits.

Before thinking about the marketing strategies in this article/video, I was convinced. I hoped everyone could one day get their hands on one of these groundbreaking creations. However, I don’t know much about water sanitation, and quite frankly I am not extremely educated on waterborne diseases.

Clearly, I am their target audience. I sat wide-eyed staring at my laptop screen watching this video. “It’s revolutionary!” I thought. But as I thought a little harder, I began to think I was just falling into their trap.

As I think a little more clearly, I have begun to realize that the target audience should not just be those who are fortunate enough to sit in a classroom in Isenberg School Of Management at the University of Massachusetts, but also those in need. Yes, there is a little message on each page of the book educating people on safe water habits, but how will they learn about this in the first place? I’m sure this product really is very effective, but shouldn’t they also be focusing on how to get this product to the people who need it, instead of just saying how great it is?

I believe there is a little something missing here. This article was extremely captivating at first, but overall, maybe not as effective as is could have and should have been.

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